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How Budget Changes Affect Working For Families

(PR.co.nz)

1. Low income one-child family

Lisa is a sole parent. She earns $30,000 a year and has a 10-year-old child. She currently receives $148.04 a week in Working for Families tax credits. From 1 April 2012, this will go up to $152.64 a week – an increase of $4.60.

2. High income four-child family

Matt and Sarah’s family income is $125,000 per year – right near the top of the WFF scale for a four-child family. They have four children aged 11, 13, 14 and 16. Matt and Sarah currently receive $38.62 a week in WFF tax credits. From 1 July 2012, as a result of the slightly lower abatement threshold, a slightly faster abatement rate and the fact there is no inflation increase in the FTC rate for 16-18 year olds, they will receive $25.96 a week – a reduction of $12.66.

3. Low income three-child family

Michael and Kiri’s combined family income is $40,000 a year. They have three children aged 10, 13 and 16. They currently receive $280.76 a week in WFF tax credits. From 1 April 2012, this will go up to $284.88 a week – an increase of $4.12.

4. Middle income two-child family

Elaine and Mataio’s combined family income is around $61,000 a year. They have two children, aged 8 and 10. Elaine and Mataio currently receive $116 a week in WFF tax credits. From 1 April 2012, they will continue to receive $116 in WFF tax credits.

5. Average wage two-child family

Tane and Gemma have two children aged 2 and 4. Gemma is not working and Tane earns $50,000 a year, about the average wage. They currently receive $158.56 a week in WFF tax credits. From 1 April, 2012 this will go up to $161.24 a week – an increase of $2.68.

6. Average household income two-child family

Mark and Emma’s family income is $77,000 a year – about the same as the average household income and towards the top of the WFF scale for a two-child family. They have two children aged 9 and 11. They currently receive $54.72 a week in WFF tax credits. From 1 April 2012, as a result of the slightly lower abatement threshold and a slightly faster abatement rate, they will receive $50.90 a week – a reduction of $3.82.

7. Higher income three-child family

Ben and Isa’s combined family income is $100,000 a year – near the top of the WFF scale for a three-child family. Their children are aged 2, 4 and 6. They currently receive $27.45 a week in WFF tax credits. From 1 April 2012, as a result of the slightly lower abatement threshold and a slightly faster abatement rate, they will receive $21.30 a week – a reduction of $6.15.

8. Minimum wage four-child family

Jenny and Peter have four children aged 7, 9, 11 and 14. Jenny is not working and Peter earns just over $27,000 a year, which is about the minimum wage. Jenny and Peter currently receive $346.61 a week in WFF tax credits. From 1 July 2012, this will go up to $360.79 a week – an increase of $14.18.

9. Higher income two-child family

Chris is a sole parent. He earns $90,000 a year and has two children aged 11 and 16. His income is right near the top of the WFF scale for a two-child family. Chris currently receives $18.66 a week in WFF tax credits. From 1 April 2012, as a result of the slightly lower abatement threshold, a slightly faster abatement rate and the fact that there is no inflation increase in the Family Tax Credit (FTC) rate for 16-18 year olds, Chris will receive $7.12 a week – a reduction of $11.54.

NOTE: All examples assume family income remains constant and that 16-18 year old children do not leave school or training to take up work, leave home or go on a benefit, all of which would end their eligibility for Working for Families.

Media Release 19 May 2011 from Bill English, Minister of Finance.

 



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